"The Invention of a portable Fresco

A Wall on Canvas or Wood, or any other portable thing, of dimensions ever so large, or ever so small, which may be removed with the same convenience as so many easel Pictures; is worthy the consideration of the Rich and those who have the direction of public Works.  If the Frescos of APELLES, of PROTOGENES, of RAPHAEL, or MICHAEL ANGELO could have been removed, we might, perhaps, have them now in England.  I could divide Westminster

  Fitzwilliam  Museum Cambridge, An Allegory of the Spiritual State of Man - 1811

Fitzwilliam Museum Cambridge, An Allegory of the Spiritual State of Man - 1811

  Hall, or the walls of any other great Building, into compartments and ornament them with Frescos, which would be removable at pleasure.

Oil will not drink or absorb Colour enough to stand the test of very little Time and of the Air; it grows yellow, and at length brown.  It was never generally used till after VANDYKE'S time.  All the little old Pictures, called cabinet Pictures, are in Fresco, and not in Oil.

  Fresco Painting is properly Miniature, or Enamel Painting; every thing in Fresco is as high finished as Miniature or Enamel, although in Works larger than Life.  The Art has been lost: I have recovered it.  How this was done, will be told, together with the whole Process, in a Work on Art, now in the Press.  The ignorant Insults of Individuals will not hinder me from doing my duty to my Art.  Fresco Painting, as it is now practised, is like most other things, the contrary of what it pretends to be.

  The execution of my Designs, being all in Water-colours, (that is in Fresco) are regularly refused to be exhibited by the Royal Academy, and the British Institution has,  this year, followed its example, and has effectually excluded me  by this Resolution; I therefore invite those Noblemen and  Gentlem[e]n, who are its Subscribers, to inspect what they have  excluded: and those who have been told that my Works are  but an unscientific and irregular Eccentricity, a Madman's Scrawls, I demand of them to do me the justice to examine before they decide.

  There cannot be more than two or three great Painters or Poets in any Age or Country; and these, in a corrupt state of Society, are easily excluded, but not so easily obstructed.  They have ex[c]luded Watercolours; it is therefore become necessary that I should exhibit to the Public, in an Exhibition of my own, my Designs, Painted in Watercolours.  If Italy is enriched and made great by RAPHAEL, if MICHAEL ANGELO is its supreme glory, if Art is the glory of a Nation, if Genius and Inspiration are the great Origin and Bond of Society, the distinction my Works have obtained from those who best understand such things, calls for my Exhibition as the greatest of Duties to my Country.                     

WILLIAM BLAKE"

BLAKE'S EXHIBITION AND CATALOGUE OF 1809